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Winning a Chargeback Dispute: Documentation Guidelines

When a customer charges an order back, merchants are able to dispute the chargeback. In order to dispute a merchant-liable chargeback, you'll need to submit proof that the customer's claim is invalid. The more evidence you provide, the better your chances are of winning the dispute. 

Note  Even if the customer tells you that they are going to retract a chargeback dispute, we still recommend submitting evidence in case the customer fails to issue the retraction.

The documentation that is needed may differ depending on the chargeback reason. Below please find common chargeback reasons as well as the documentation typically needed to successfully dispute the chargeback.

Disputes typically resolve to five primary cases:

Merchandise Not Received

In order to best represent you in a dispute where the customer claims to have not received the product they ordered, you'll need to prove that the goods were shipped in a timely fashion; shipped to the correct shipping address; and received prior to the dispute.

To that end, the following evidence is helpful:

  • Order Invoice, including shipping address and order date
  • Name of Shipping Carrier
  • Order Tracking Number
  • Link to the order tracking page on the carrier's website
  • Evidence of delivery by the carrier (screenshot showing that the order was delivered to the address/destination on the invoice or signed proof of delivery is recommended)
  • Shipping receipt, to prove date of shipment
  • Any correspondence you may have with the customer
  • Summary of order timeline (the customer placed order on this date, we shipped the order on this date, according to UPS/FedEx/USPS, the order was delivered to the customer on this date)

Product Not as Described or Defective

In order to best represent you in a dispute where the customer claims that the product is not as described or defective, you'll need to prove that the goods delivered were in fact what was described; that they were delivered in good condition; and that the customer didn't attempt a return. On top of that, you'll need to prove that the goods were shipped in a timely fashion to the correct shipping address, and received prior to the dispute.

To that end, your chances of winning the dispute are best if you provide the following:

  • Order Invoice
  • Proof that what was delivered was what was described, such as website product descriptions or photographs of merchandise
  • Proof that goods were delivered to the correct address, including:
    • Name of Shipping Carrier
    • Order Tracking Number
    • Link to the order tracking page on the carrier's website
    • Shipping Receipt
  • Any correspondence you may have with the customer
  • Documentation explaining why you disagree with the customer's claims

If the customer is claiming that you wouldn't allow them to return the defective item, please also provide:

  • Proof that the customer read your return policy prior to purchase, including:
    • A recording of a phone call prior to purchase in which the return policy was explained
    • Records that a customer explicitly acknowledged a return policy online, such as by a "click-to-accept" acknowledgment of terms and conditions
    • Proof that your checkout flow contains your return policy or requires an explicit acknowledgment of terms & conditions
  • Return Authorizations, if applicable

Refund not Received 

In order to best represent you in a dispute in which the customer claims that a refund that they were owed was not received, you'll need to prove that the refund was issued prior to the chargeback; that the goods were not returned; or that the goods were returned without appropriate authorization.

Your chances of winning are highest if you can provide the following:

  • Proof that a refund in the amount of the chargeback was issued prior to the chargeback. A screenshot of the refund from your Bolt Merchant Dashboard is sufficient.
  • If a refund wasn't issued because you were awaiting a return from the customer, please send:
    • Order Invoice
    • Proof that goods were delivered to the correct address, including:
      • Name of Shipping Carrier
      • Order Tracking Number
      • Link to the order tracking page on the carrier's website
      • Shipping Receipt
    • Return Authorizations, if applicable
    • Proof that the order was not returned 
    • Correspondence with the customer 
  • If the customer returned merchandise without authorization, you'll need:
    • Order Invoice
    • Proof that the customer read your return policy prior to purchase, including:
      • A recording of a phone call prior to purchase in which the return policy was explained.
      • Records that a customer explicitly acknowledged a return policy online (such as a "click-to-accept" acknowledgment of terms and conditions).
    • Correspondence with the customer 

Merchant-Liable Fraud

There are a few instances where merchants will be liable for fraudulent chargebacks.

The instances of merchant-liable fraud are:

  • The order was placed by the merchant.
  • The shipping address was updated without receiving confirmation from Bolt.
  • The transaction was Force Approved by the merchant or the merchant's agent.

Evidence is required in order to properly represent a merchant liable fraudulent chargeback.

We will need the following evidence from the merchant:

  • Order invoice
  • Tracking details
  • Proof of Delivery
  • Any and all communication that the merchant has had with the customer (emails, texts, phone calls, etc)
  • A summary of the order history

Duplicate Processing

The Duplicate Processing chargeback code is issued by a customer when they've accidentally placed two orders.

Duplicate orders can happen:

  • If the customer has multiple checkout windows open at the same time.
  • Because of a failed webhook

If Bolt determines that we are the reason for the duplication, we will take care of the chargeback and ensure the customer and the merchant are refunded the extra charge. However, if the customer accidentally placed two orders, we will need details in order to properly represent the chargeback.

We will need the following details from the merchant:

  • Order Invoices for both orders
  • Tracking details for both orders
  • Proof of Delivery
  • Any return details (if applicable)
  • A summary of any communication with the customer regarding the double order.
  • A summary of the order history, from the merchant
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